Art Therapy: How to Draw a Mandala

Final product image
What You’ll Be Creating

Intricate geometric compositions created on a base of a circle, known as mandalas, have a deep spiritual meaning in Hinduism and Buddhism. They represent the whole of the universe, and they can be used as an exercise or for meditation. Recently, the basic idea of drawing a radial pattern has been also adopted by the Western world, as a tool for therapy or simply relaxation.

Drawing a mandala (or what is widely considered as a mandala in Western civilization) can seem very strenuous and difficult at first, but it’s actually the opposite. The intricate look of a mandala comes from following a rhythm, which turns a little effort into a stunning result. Doing the same thing over and over, and advancing despite it, is very relaxing and lets you stay in the moment. You can read more about drawing as a therapy in this introduction to the series:

You can follow my steps directly, use the same techniques for your own mandala, or simply read the whole thing just to learn about drawing mandalas.

What You Will Need

As with most personal art therapy activities, you don’t need any professional art supplies. You can get these tools even in supermarkets!

  • sheet of paper (even copy paper will do)
  • pencil
  • drawing compass
  • ruler
  • protractor
  • fineliner/thin marker/pigment ink pen (any color you like)
  • (optionally) thicker marker

You can draw a mandala with a pencil only, if you want, but dark markers make the pattern cleaner and more definite. A pencil has some uncertainty in it; you never know when the line is done. With a marker pen, you have a sense of stability, and the lines seem more real.

basic drawing supplies mandala

There’s one more thing you need to draw a mandala: a proper mindset. Sure, you can treat it as a normal drawing, with a certain goal in mind, but you can gain more than just the satisfaction of a pretty artwork if you do it properly. Treat it as a meditation session. Sit comfortably, in quiet or with some pleasant music, and focus on this one activity.

Don’t think about how it’s going to look when you finish, or how people will react when they see it. Don’t make it about yourself, and don’t treat it as a test of your drawing skill or self-worth. Let the rhythm take you around each circle, and let the mandala become your whole world for now. There’s no good or bad—just the rhythm, lines, and contrast.

Don’t scold yourself for mistakes; it’s natural that they happen. Ignore them or make them a part of the rhythm, so they stop being a mistake and become a part of the pattern you could never imagine before. This is your mandala—nobody should care what it looks like, and nor should you care about them.

Let yourself be creative. Don’t restrain yourself from drawing something experimental, just because there’s a risk it will not look good in the end. There should be no shame in drawing a mandala. No matter how you do it, no matter how it looks, it’s good, because you have created it. A pretty mandala won’t change the world for the better, neither will an “ugly” one make your life worse.

So sit down, and take a breath. Smile and draw your soul out. Make this mandala yours, without any attachment to the outer world, and see how much joy you can take from this simple activity. Make these words of David Mamet your motto for this session:

Art is an expression of joy and awe. It is not an attempt to share one’s virtues and accomplishments with the audience, but an act of selfless spirit. Our effect is not for us to know. It is not in our control. Only our intention is under our control.

1. How to Plan a Mandala

Step 1

It’s possible to draw a mandala without any plan, but it has two disadvantages:

  • You have to switch from pen to compass all the time, which breaks focus.
  • The risk of losing the rhythm is high.

If you draw a plan for the mandala first, later you can focus on drawing without worrying about keeping the rhythm. You just follow it and see the pattern emerge as if by some kind of magic!

Take the compass and stick it in the center of the sheet. Draw a small circle, then a bigger one, and another, using various distances between them. Making the circles concentric is the only rule here.

concentric circles mandala plan

Step 2

Take the ruler and draw a horizontal line across the center (tip: place the ruler slightly lower to make space for the pencil).

mandala horizontal line plan
mandala horizontal line across

Step 3

Take the protractor and place it along the line, pointing directly at the center. Draw a mark every 30 degrees: at 30, 60, 90, 120, and 150. This will give us 12 sections. You can use fewer or more, if you want—there’s no rule for this!

mandala sections protractor

Step 4

Take the ruler again and draw a line between the center and every mark, across the whole plan. Again, be careful to save some space for the line over the ruler.

mandala how to draw sections
mandala sections plan

2. How to Draw the Center of the Mandala

Step 1

OK, let’s start right from the center. We need to fill that smallest circle with some kind of repetitive pattern. What can be easy to repeat, in this small space and with the guide lines you have there? I decided to draw a little flower petal filling the whole section.

mandala center fill

Step 2 

Replicate the element until you fill the whole circle. Be slow and methodical—there’s no hurry! Focus on the movement of your hand, on the noise made by your tool, and think only about what you’re drawing at the moment. Leave the future for later!

mandala fill whole center

Step 3

Darken the circle to enclose the pattern within clear boundaries.

mandala first row filled

Step 4

Let’s go to another circle. To continue with this flowery theme, we can draw more interesting petals. Draw one side of it…

mandala petal one side

… and copy it all around the circle.

mandala petal side copied

Step 5

Now draw another side of the petal.

mandala second side petal
mandala full flower

Step 6

You can create another clean boundary of this circle before going to the next one. Here let’s try another trick: you don’t need to follow strictly the guide lines of the plan—you can add more! For example, you can cut every section in half to create another rhythm.

mandala cut section in half
mandala new rhythm

Step 7

Let’s create a leaf on this base.

mandala leaf outline
mandala leaves row
mandala leaf details
mandala all leaves detailed

Step 8

Not every circle must be enclosed with a dark outline. You can freely go straight to another one and derive your new pattern from the previous row.

mandala new pattern
mandala new pattern on old row

Step 9

Too simple? Fill the shapes with more shapes!

mandala detailed shape
mandala detailed shape done
mandala more details
mandala full flower with details

Step 10

Dark circles can beautifully fill the space and add some appealing contrast.

mandala dark circle
mandala dark circles fill

Step 11

Still too empty? You can add something else. No matter how simple and weird it looks in one section, it will be turned into a beautiful pattern by the rhythm. So don’t be afraid to experiment!

mandala weird details
mandala experimental details

Step 12

A boundary between one row and another doesn’t need to be dark and boring. You can make it more detailed, if there’s enough space.

mandala detailed boundary
mandala detailed border

Step 13

If the new pattern becomes very detailed, the earlier one may appear empty in comparison, but nothing stops you from going back to it and adding more detail!

mandala adding more details
mandala old part more detailed
mandala center fixed
mandala more details in center
mandala little dots
mandala little dots in flower
mandala tiny details
mandala tiny details done

3. How to Draw the Outer Part of a Mandala

Step 1

There’s no requirement for the size of the mandala—you can go as far as you like! However, the further from the center, the bigger each section. So it can be a good idea to divide each one into more sections, for example thirds—whatever is easy enough for you to measure.

mandala divide in thirds
mandala more sections by division
mandala simple boundary

Step 2

You can create interesting patterns by using contrast. If you have a thicker pen, this is where it can be useful, but filling a small section with a thin pen can be quite relaxing as well—unless you hurry!

mandala fill whole section
mandala whole sections filled

Step 3

Let’s fill the empty space with some lines.

mandala empty space fixed
mandala empty space filled
mandala arch details
mandala arches added

Step 4

Let’s try a different shape this time. You can borrow the guide lines straight from the previous row.

mandala triangle top
mandala all triangles
mandala inner triangle detail
mandala triangle ornament

Step 5

More triangles!

mandala more triangles
mandala triangle decoration

Step 6

When you draw a big circular boundary, it’s easy to make a mistake. Small mistakes are not so visible in the complexity of a mandala, but if you want, you can always fix such a thing with a thicker line.

mandala mistake
mandala how to fix mistake

Step 7

Let’s add more contrast.

mandala contrast pretty
mandala contrast important
mandala contrast ornament
mandala add contrast
mandala how to add dark

Step 8

There’s a lot of space here that’s waiting to be filled! Let’s do it quickly.

mandala simple lines
mandala filled simply
mandala simple decoration
mandala simple decor finished

Step 9

Prepare another row.

mandala another row start
mandala another row finish
mandala another row boundary

Step 10

What else can we draw, that we haven’t drawn before?

mandala cross triangle
mandala cross triangles finished

Step 11

The contrast with the rows below suggests we add more darkness here as well.

mandala contrast triangles
mandala filled triangles

4. How to Finish a Mandala

Step 1

A mandala ends when you want it to end, but it’s good to finish it in a special way. Let’s go back to the big sections now and recreate the petals from the very beginning.

mandala big petal
mandala big petals one side
mandala big petals second side
mandala full big flower

Step 2

To make them a part of the pattern instead of just a boundary of a huge empty space, give these petals a thick frame. A thicker pen can be useful here.

mandala thick frame petals
mandala dark petals

Step 3

One more line will make the space less empty.

mandala how to make less space
mandala empty space filled

Step 4

Maybe it’s time for some dots? We haven’t added any for a while.

mandala more dots
mandala more dots added

Step 5

I looked at the row below and it looks quite empty, almost merging with the upper row. Let’s fix it.

mandala consistency
mandala how to keep consistent

Step 6

More petals! To make them very big, I crossed two rows at once.

mandala huge petals
mandala huge petals sketched
mandala close petal
mandala huge petals finished

Step 7

Let’s give them a clean frame this time.

mandala clean frame petal
mandala petals with clean frame

Step 8

Add a simple pattern to fill up the empty space:

mandala simple pattern inside
mandala simple pattern fill

Step 9

To make the mandala more open, we can add some elements outside. For example, attach a circle to each petal.

mandala attach circle
mandala small circles attached

Step 10

Fill it for a better contrast.

mandala fill the circle
mandala circles filled

Step 11

Each circle can be extended into more circles, to bring attention to the outside, as a balance for the strikingly detailed inside.

mandala open
mandala outside more interesting

Step 12

Not every boundary must be a closing line. To keep it open, make it with circles.

mandala circle boundary
mandala circles row

Step 13

Finally, take a look at the mandala as a whole and see if you want to add anything.

mandala finished

Beautiful!

Look at your mandala once again. Try to see it for what it is, not for what it isn’t. Don’t compare it to something in your mind, some vision of what it was “supposed to” look like. After all, if your goal was to draw a mandala, and you did it, then you succeeded!

There’s a tradition in Tibetan Buddhism of creating sand mandalas that are ceremoniously destroyed after they’re finished. It symbolizes the fleeting nature of our life—no matter how much effort we put in, no matter what we achieve, it will end the same way for everyone. You can recreate this practice by destroying your mandala, to remind yourself that it’s really the process that’s important, not the end result. That it’s the journey that matters, not the destination. And having that in mind, it’s easier to enjoy the process of creation without worrying about the end result.

And if drawing a mandala has put you into a mood for more drawing, you may like these simple tutorials:

You may also be interested in our other mandala-related tutorials:

how to draw mandala step by step

Art for All: Celebrate Diversity in Design—Volume 2

Welcome back to Volume Two of our Diversity in Design series on Envato Tuts+. Discover four talented artists with inspiring styles you’ll love.

4 Artists You Should Know: Diversity in Design

Celebrate the work of these extraordinary artists. Each with their own unique background, they draw inspiration from their culture and surroundings to create phenomenal illustrations.

Shyama Golden

Shyama is an illustrator living in Brooklyn, New York.

From ill rap legends to cat-covered Sasquatches, Shyama’s work is full of charisma and power. See more in her portfolio, or follow her on Twitter @shyamagolden

Biggie

I’m an artist and illustrator with a graphic design education and
background. My parents came to the US from Sri Lanka before I was born
and both worked as scientists, but encouraged me to find my own path.

I
worked as a designer for a decade
before feeling brave enough to switch over to a career in art.

Biggie by Shyama Golden
Biggie

Arundhati Roy

I’m mostly inspired by capturing a feeling of life. My favorite mediums are oil paints, digital
media on the iPad Pro, and I also like to use animation and patterns in my work.

Arundhati Roy by Shyama Golden
Arundhati Roy

Catsquatch

Catsquatch by Shyama Golden
Catsquatch

Maria

I know my
design background influences my work, especially the patterns. I try not to be 100% tied to any
particular art movement or trend that is popular at the moment. I create the things I want to see in the world, or what I feel is missing or
underrated.

Maria by Shyama Golden
Maria

Tavo Montañez

Father, teacher, and jazz lover Tavo Montañez is our second artist from Aguascalientes, Mexico.

His fluid illustrations merge his Mexican cultural influence and creative experimentation. See more in his portfolio, or follow him on Facebook.

Los Amores de Frida

My name is Gustavo Díaz Montañez (Tavo Montañez).

I am an illustrator working mostly in the editorial, publishing, and advertising industries.
My process usually involves drawing
with pencil, ink on paper, and digital coloring.

Los Amores de Frida by Tavo Montanez
Los Amores de Frida {The Loves of Frida)

Perspective Magazine: Time to Act

I’m inspired by nature in general. I love women, animals, textures,
water, and even fiction and monsters. There is a desire within me to always improve my work by finding new mediums and challenges.

Perspective Magazine Time to Act
Perspective Magazine: Time to Act

Los Amores de Frida

Los Amores de Frida
Los Amores de Frida (The Loves of Frida)

10.10

I always turn to the work of my compatriots for inspiration. There’s Saturnino Herrán,
Ernesto García Cabral, and César Moreno among others.

1010
10.10

Catalina Vásquez

Catalina is an animator and illustrator from Medellín, Colombia.

Her delightful illustrations step inside everyday life with bold patterns and textures. See more in her portfolio, or follow her on Instagram.

The Weaver

I’m Catalina Vásquez (Kathiuska) and I started learning illustration on my own during the middle of my audiovisual communication studies. I like to portray everyday life in my illustrations.

I also love moving images, so I’m now working on my second short animated film called, Jail.

The Weaver by Catalina Vasquez
The Weaver

Medellín Brand Campaign

My inspiration is in daily life. I think my work is very autobiographical
and emotional. So I like to go out and see what’s happening around me
and later, process all this information to create my stuff.

Medelln Brand Campaign by Catalina Vasquez
“Expand Your Ideas.” Medellín Brand Campaign

Girl’s Night

Girls Night by Catalina Vasquez
Girl’s Night

Medellín Brand Campaign

I’ve always felt very inspired by the UPA animation studio art style, and American cartoons.

But I also like the concept art
of shows like Mr. Magoo and the Pink Panther for when I need color palettes and inspiration. I love illustrating children’s books, so I’m a fan of artists like Isabel Arsenault, Rebecca Green, and Olga Demidova.

Medelln Brand Campaign by Catalina Vasquez
“Expand Your World.” Medellín Brand Campaign

Eunjoo Lee

Our final artist is Eunjoo Lee. She’s a Korean illustrator and textile designer from Glasgow, Scotland.

Blending her love of art history and Utopian fantasies, Eunjoo creates unique textile illustrations for indoor fabrics and more. See more in her portfolio, or follow her on Instagram.

Utopia

The inspiration behind my illustrations is about the
individualized fantasy of utopia, and how it affects personality. It’s my visual language inspired by the historical art
movement.

Utopia by Eunjoo Lee
Utopia

Korean Fairy Tale Scarf

I try to use a lot of symbols in my artwork because I’m interested in the hidden meanings behind these creative languages.

Korean Fairy Tale Scarf
Korean Fairy Tale Scarf

Haetae

Haetae by Eunjoo Lee
Haetae

Korean Traditional Costume

I’m inspired by a diverse set of visual artists. My textile design
ideas come from Vårklockor Josef Frank, Makoto Kagoshima and historical Asian textile designs.

I also look up to modern artists too, such as Picasso, Miro, Kiki Smiths, and lots of others.

Korean Traditional Costume
Korean Traditional Costume

Celebrate Diversity! Send Us Your Favorite Artists!

Help us find more incredible artists from different backgrounds to share with our audience! Tweet me your recommendations at MelloNieves or use the hashtags #artforall and #tutsplusdesign on Twitter and Instagram. You never know, we may just feature you in our next article!

I’d like to extend a warm thank you to all the artists who participated in
this feature. Feel free to see more of their work in the links below:

How to Draw a Hamburger and a Hot Dog in Adobe Illustrator

Final product image
What You’ll Be Creating

In this tutorial, you will learn how to use the Mesh Tool in Adobe Illustrator to create a hot dog and a hamburger!

If you want to skip the tutorial and just use these items in your work, you can purchase the Hot Dog and the Hamburger from GraphicRiver!

Hot Dog
the Hot Dog
Hamburger
the Hamburger

1. How to Create a Hot Dog Mesh

Step 1

Let’s start off by drawing the top bun with Gradient Mesh.

Create an orange rectangle—the color is #CF6822.

Next, grab the Mesh Tool (U). By clicking, create nodes, which in turn create a Mesh Grid. When you have four rows and four columns of mesh, grab the edges of the rectangle and move them to make the shape rounder. It should resemble the top half of a bun.

Once you’re done with the shaping, select the bottom two rows of nodes and color them with #F5CD99.

Finally, color the top two rows of nodes with #A3320E.

begin drawing the bun with mesh

Step 2

Finish off drawing the top visible half of the hot dog bun by placing more Mesh nodes and coloring them as in the screenshot below.

Always look for the nodes that are selected in each step and color them with the hex code that is present under each image.

You will need these colors:

  1. #E19843
  2. #F0AF4B
  3. #F6D4AF
  4. #DB9559
draw top mesh bun

Step 3

Begin drawing the bottom part of the bun. Follow the screenshot, as in the previous steps.

  1. #CF6822
  2. #A0330F
  3. #EDC089
draw mesh bun

Step 4

Finish coloring the bun.

  1. #F3BE5E
  2. #F9E3C0
  3. #E2A36A
  4. #8F2609
create bottom bun

Step 5

Begin drawing the sausage in the same manner.

  1. #C94D21
  2. #89190C
  3. #F9ECE8
color mesh sausage

Step 6

Add a few more touches.

  1. #D37550
  2. #6D0800
color sausage

Step 7

Change some colors on the right tip of the sausage.

  1. #A0321A
  2. #881E0E
finish sausage tip

Step 8

Color some nodes with #BD4E31.

Then, modify the nodes on the right and left tips of the sausage as indicated below.

finish sausage

Step 9

Let’s draw the mustard!

  1. #FBD020
  2. #D6560A
draw mustard

Step 10

To make it wavy, create some more Mesh nodes. Then, select every other column, alternating them, and press the Down key a couple of times, moving the nodes downwards.

Repeat until the image looks like a wavy strip of mustard.

change mustard shape

Step 11

Tweak the shape and the colors a bit more.

  1. #D98911
  2. #FFFFFF
mustard

Step 12

Now we need some shadows. Draw two shapes and fill them with #5B1B0C and #C94D21, as indicated below.

Place the smaller shape inside the bigger one.

make shapes for blend

Step 13

Change the Opacity of the big shape to 0%.

change opacity

Step 14

Next, select both objects and go to Object > Blend > Blend Options. Set the mode to Specified Steps with an amount of 30Object > Blend > Make to create the shadow.

make blend

Step 15

Create a thinner copy of the Blend. Change the Transparency of both objects to Multiply.

create copy

Step 16

Place the shadows under both buns.

place shadows

Step 17

Add the sausage in the back and the mustard strip on top.

add sausage

Step 18

Let’s draw another shadow! Use #5B1B0C and #FFFFFF.

circles for shadow

Step 19

Create another Blend like we just did in Steps 13-14.

make blend

Step 20

Place the shadow under the hot dog!

place shadow

2. How to Create a Texture

Step 1

In this optional section, we will create a texture for the meat in our burger.

You can choose to skip this one, but if you don’t, head over to my autumn tutorial and complete Steps 13-14 in the first section.

Select and isolate only the indicated cluster of paths, as indicated in the screenshot below.

isolate texture

Step 2

Clone this particular part until you create a fairly long line.

clone texture

Step 3

Group (Control-G) these elements, and then change their Transparency to Overlay and Opacity to 50%.

change opacity

3. How to Draw the Hamburger

Step 1

Begin drawing the top bun with Meshjust as we did with the hot dog.

  1. #FDCC8D
  2. #933800
  3. #D8883B
start top mesh bun

Step 2

Continue coloring.

  1. #BC681E
  2. #FFF1C6
  3. #FFBF6A
top bun

Step 3

Add some more final touches.

  1. #FFCC82
  2. #7E2403
  3. #E1C5B2
finish bun mesh

Step 4

Modify the nodes on the bottom edge to give the bun a more realistic look.

modify bun

Step 5

Draw another Blend shadow, just as we did before in Steps 12-14 of the previous section.

  • #5B1D07
  • #AA4B0B
make blend

Step 6

Place the shadow under the bun.

place shadow

Step 7

Draw the first piece of cheese.

  1. #FFE885
  2. #CB7B0E
  3. #CC7D10
  4. #FCC94E
draw mesh cheese

Step 8

Finish the cheese.

  1. #FFFBEC
  2. #FEF1B4
  3. #CF7F12
  4. #520300
finish melted cheese

Step 9

Draw the cucumber.

  1. #437000
  2. #8EA456
  3. #567902
draw cucumber

Step 10

Finish the vegetable.

  1. #8BA152
  2. #2C4500
  3. #365900
draw cucumber

Step 11

Create two copies of the Mesh side to side. Then, draw a green ellipse representing the top of each cucumber.

finish cucumbers

Step 12

Place the ingredients under the bun.

add elements to the burger

Step 13

Draw the tomato.

  1. #D10C07
  2. #FD6853
  3. #690100
mesh tomato

Step 14

Finish the tomato.

  1. #3A0000
  2. #FFFFFF
  3. #B90100
draw tomato

Step 15

Add a #A51500 top to the tomato.

finish tomato

Step 16

Begin the second piece of cheese.

  1. #FFE36C
  2. #E59000
  3. #A42B08
draw mesh cheese

Step 17

Color the cheese.

  1. #913B00
  2. #FFFFFF
  3. #FFF49B
draw cheese

Step 18

Draw the meat.

  1. #874115
  2. #340902
  3. #A6591D
draw meat with mesh

Step 19

Finish the meat.

  1. #FFE36C
  2. #E59000
  3. #A42B08
finish drawing meat

Step 20

If you made the texture before, apply it to the meat.

add texture to meat

Step 21

Draw the onion.

  1. #FAF5C8
  2. #3D1506
  3. #FFFFF2
  4. #E9E1AC
  5. #E3CC98
draw onion

Step 22

Add the ingredients to the burger.

add elements of burger

Step 23

Finally, draw the bottom bun.

  1. #FBCE73
  2. #EB9626
  3. #A75C1D
  4. #A0780D
draw bottom bun with mesh

Step 24

Finish the bun.

  1. #945D1B
  2. #F9DC9B
  3. #EB982A
  4. #B5681B
draw bun

Step 25

Draw the seeds for the bun.

  1. #ECB369
  2. #FBEDAC
  3. #FAC781
draw seeds with mesh

Step 26

Finish drawing the seeds.

  1. #FDE5A1
  2. #D89748
  3. #C4711E
  4. #E5A75B
draw seeds

Step 27

Add seeds on top of the burger.

add seeds

Step 28

Grab the shadow we created for the hot dog and place it under the burger!

add shadow

Awesome Work, You’re Now Done!

Thank you for following along, and please feel welcome to post your result in the comments. I’ll be looking
forward to seeing it!

In this tutorial, you learned how to
create a pair of fast food items using the Mesh Tool.

I hope you’ve enjoyed this tutorial and learned how to use some useful
tools for the future! Check out some of my other vector tutorials on my instructor profile.

You can purchase these items (Hot Dog, Hamburger) as well as other similar designs in my portfolio on GraphicRiver.

Hamburger
Hamburger
Hot Dog
Hot Dog

My Journey Of Learning Programming Through Flatiron School #42

My name is Mason Ellwood, and I’m currently working on Flatiron School’s Online Full Stack Web Development Program. Each week, I’ll be writing about my experience, what I’m learning, and tips on learning to code.

So as you all know I finally started learning Javascript! Which is amazing and has helped me out at work immensely. But like all things that you begin to learn for the first time, it becomes a real pain in the butt until you slowly grasp how everything fits together. But I have been amazed at how quickly those pieces are fitting together once I grasped my first OO programming language. How all these pieces fit together and everything is connected in a sense to complete a task.

My time that I have to spend through The Flatiron School so far has taught me to think of things in a different way. How to think of things at a larger scale to complete a task and bring that skill in a tangible form to the workplace.

So for this first lesson, I will give a brief overview of Javascript and we will go through what I have learned together as I am going over it. So you can better understand how I have gone from writing zero Javascript to hopefully being proficient in the language.

As you probably already know, Javascript is the universally accepted language of the internet. As far as a developer standard you should know how to use it.

JavaScript is a dynamic, untyped, and interpreted programming language; it is prototype-based and supports both object-oriented and functional approaches.” – The Flatiron School

If you have never written any Javascript go ahead and open up your console and we will try it out together. To open up the console simple right-click anywhere on this screen and select Inspect. Go to the top of the dialogue box and select Console. This area that you are now it is considered a sandbox. If you are using a mac press Command + K and it will clear the screen for you.

In this sandbox environment, you are now able to write and execute code directly in this environment. If you have been following along in my previous posts this is very similar to the IRB environment. A sandbox if you think of like a sandbox, it is an open area where you can do or make anything you can think of, with some limitations.

Remember how we could play in sandboxes as kids: building castles, moats, and shaping an entire world without worrying about the consequences outside of that world? In programming, sandboxes work the same way: they’re environments that we have complete control over, but whose contents don’t spill into the outside world.)” – The Flatiron School

Inside this Sandbox environment type alert(“Hello World”); And check out the response. You should be given the response below.

This should give you a popup window that prints out the information added to the screen.

Congratulations you have officially written your first lines of Javascript!

A large part of programming is experimentation — we come up with a hypothesis (how we think something should work) and test it with code.” – The Flatiron School

Javascript is a means of completing a task, and with you as the developer thinking about how things should be done without a clear picture to how it should be done. There are endless possibilities to doing the same thing with Javascript, but it is your job as the developer to chose that path.

Try Our New Course in Creative Typography

Final product image
What You’ll Be Creating

Looking to develop your creativity and hone your Photoshop and Illustrator skills with a challenging typographic project? Our new course, Creative Typography, is ideal for you.

What You’ll Learn

In this course, you will learn how to design a piece of concept-driven, typographic artwork. Graphic designer Matt Withers will share practical tips for improving your creative process, demonstrate some techniques for how to create custom lettering in Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop, and debunk some myths about creativity along the way.

Watch the Introduction

Take the Course

You can take our new course straight away with a subscription to Envato Elements. For a single low monthly fee, you get access not only to this course, but also to our growing library of over 1,000 video courses and industry-leading eBooks on Envato Tuts+. 

Plus you now get unlimited downloads from the huge Envato Elements library of 320,000+ photos and 36,000+ design assets and templates. Create with unique fonts, photos, graphics and templates, and deliver better projects faster.

How to Create a Wind Rose Compass Symbol Illustration in Adobe Illustrator

Final product image
What You’ll Be Creating

In the following steps, you will learn how to create a wind rose compass symbol illustration in Adobe Illustrator. 

For starters, you will learn how to set up a simple grid, how to center shapes, and how to create the main object using a circle and the Appearance panel. Taking full advantage of the Transform effect, you will learn how to easily multiply shapes and how to create a pretty complex compass grid using only a few paths. 

Using a simple blend, the Rotate Tool and some more Transform effects, you will learn how to create the compass needles. Using neat stroke techniques and the Appearance panel, you will learn how to create the background and some tiny details. Finally, using basic blending techniques and several raster effects, you will learn how to add a subtle texture to your final design.

For more inspiration on how to adjust or improve your final illustration, you can find plenty of resources at GraphicRiver.

1. How to Create a New Document and Set Up a Grid

Hit Control-N to create a new document. Select Pixels from the Units drop-down menu, enter 850 in the width and height boxes and then click that More Settings button. Select RGB for the Color Mode, set the Raster Effects to Screen (72 ppi) and then click that Create Document button.

Enable the Grid (View > Show Grid) and the Snap to Grid (View > Snap to Grid). You will need a grid every 5 px, so simply go to Edit > Preferences > Guides & Grid, and enter 5 in the Gridline every box and 1 in the Subdivisions box. Try not to get discouraged by all that grid—it will make your work easier, and keep in mind that you can easily enable or disable it using the Control-“ keyboard shortcut.

You can learn more about Illustrator’s grid system in this short tutorial from Andrei Stefan: Understanding Adobe Illustrator’s Grid System.

You should also open the Info panel (Window > Info) for a live preview with the size and position of your shapes. Don’t forget to set the unit of measurement to pixels from Edit > Preferences > Units. All these options will significantly increase your work speed.

setup grid

2. How to Create the Main Circle

Step 1

Pick the Ellipse Tool (L) and focus on your Toolbar. Remove the color from the stroke and then select the fill and set its color to R=226 G=228 B=243. Move to your artboard and simply create a 440 px circle—the grid and the Snap to Grid should make this easier.

Next, you need to center your shape. Open the Align panel (Window > Align) and set the alignment to artboard. If you can’t see that Align To section, open the fly-out menu from the Align panel and go to Show Options. Make sure that your circle is still selected and then click the Horizontal Align Center and Vertical Align Center buttons. This should bring your circle to the center of the artboard, as shown in the following image.

circle

Step 2

Make sure that your circle stays selected and open the Appearance panel (Window > Appearance). Add a second fill using the Add New Fill button and then select it.

Set the color to R=246 G=248 B=255 and then go to Effect > Path > Offset Path. Enter a -5 px Offset and then click that OK button.

add new fill

Step 3

Make sure that your circle stays selected and keep focusing on the Appearance panel. Add a third fill and select it. Set the color to R=226 G=228 B=243 and then go to Effect > Path > Offset Path. Enter a -15 px Offset and then click that OK button.

Keep focusing on the Appearance panel and add the other three fills shown in the following image. Use the color and offset attributes indicated below.

add new fill

Step 4

Make sure that your circle is still selected and keep focusing on the Appearance panel. Select the stroke, set its color to R=28 G=35 B=61 and increase the Weight to 4 px.

stroke

Step 5

Make sure that your circle is still selected and keep focusing on the Appearance panel. Add a second stroke using the Add New Stroke button, select it and go to Effect > Path > Offset Path. Enter a -5 px Offset and then click that OK button.

add new stroke

Step 6

Make sure that your circle is still selected and keep focusing on the Appearance panel. Add a third stroke, select it and go to Effect > Path > Offset Path. Enter a -15 px Offset and then click that OK button.

Keep focusing on the Appearance panel and add the other three strokes shown in the following image. Use the color and offset attributes indicated below. In the end things should look like in the following image.

strokes

Step 7

Make sure that your circle is still selected and keep focusing on the Appearance panel. Add a new fill, drag it to the bottom of the panel, and select it.

Set the color to R=28 G=35 B=61, lower its Opacity to 20% and then go to Effect > Path > Offset Path. Enter a -20 px Offset, click that OK button, and then go to Effect > Distort & Transform > Transform. Drag the Move-Vertical slider to -45 px, click that OK button, and then go to Effect > Blur > Gaussian Blur. Enter a 15 px Radius and then click that OK button.

gaussian blur

3. How to Create the Compass Grids

Step 1

Using the Rectangle Tool (M), create a 15 x 10 px shape, fill it with R=28 G=35 B=61 and place it exactly as shown in the first image. Keep focusing on this tiny rectangle and switch to the Direct Selection Tool (A). Select the top anchor points and simply drag them 25 px to the right. In the end things should look like in the second image.

direct selection tool

Step 2

Make sure that your tiny, dark shape is still selected and go to Effect > Distort & Transform > Transform. Drag the Move-Vertical slider to 220 px, enter 1 in that Copies box, and then click that OK button.

transform

Step 3

Make sure that your tiny, dark shape is still selected and go again to Effect > Distort & Transform > Transform. Enter 11 in that Copies box, set the Angle to 15 degrees, and then click that OK button.

transform

Step 4

Using the Pen Tool (P) or the Line Tool (\), create a 20 px vertical path and place it exactly as shown in the following image. Add a 2 px stroke for this path and set its color to R=28 G=35 B=61.

pen tool

Step 5

Make sure that your vertical path stays selected and go to Effect > Distort & Transform > Transform. Enter the attributes shown in the left window (in the following image), click that OK button, and then go again to Effect > Distort & Transform > Transform. Enter the attributes shown in the right window and then click that OK button.

transform

Step 6

Using the Pen Tool (P) or the Line Tool (\), create a 40 px vertical path and place it exactly as shown in the following image. Add a 4 px stroke for this path, set its color to R=28 G=35 B=61, and then click that Stroke piece of text to open the Stroke fly-out panel. Move to the Profile section and select Width Profile 4 from that list.

width profile

Step 7

Make sure that your vertical path stays selected and go to Effect > Distort & Transform > Transform. Enter the attributes shown in the left window (make sure that you check the Reflect Y box), click that OK button, and then go again to Effect > Distort & Transform > Transform. Enter the attributes shown in the right window and then click that OK button.

transform

Step 8

Using the Ellipse Tool (L), create a 20 px circle and place it as shown in the first image. Fill this new shape with R=226 G=228 B=243 and add a 4 px stroke. Align it to inside and set the color to R=28 G=35 B=61.

Keep focusing on this circle, pick the Anchor Point Tool (Shift-C), and simply click the four anchor points that make up your shape. This will basically turn your circle into a diamond.

diamond

Step 9

Make sure that your diamond shape is still selected and apply the two Transform effects shown in the following image.

multiply

4. How to Create the Background

Step 1

Using the Rectangle Tool (M), create a 790 px square and fill it with R=246 G=248 B=255. Send this new shape to back (Shift-Control-[) and center it using the same commands from the Align panel.

rectangle

Step 2

Make sure that your square stays selected and focus on the Appearance panel. Add a second fill, drag it to the bottom of the panel, and select it. Set the color to R=28 G=35 B=61 and then go to Effect > Path > Offset Path. Enter a 35 px Offset and then click that OK button.

background

Step 3

Make sure that your square is still selected and focus on the Appearance panel. Select the top fill and go to Effect > Stylize > Rounded Corners. Enter a 95 px Radius, click that OK button, and then go to Effect > Path > Offset Path. Enter a 10 px Offset and then click that OK button.

rounded corners

Step 4

Make sure that your square is still selected and keep focusing on the Appearance panel. Select the stroke and set its color to R=28 G=35 B=61 and then go to Effect > Stylize > Rounded Corners. Enter a 95 px Radius, click that OK button, and return to the Appearance panel. Open the Stroke fly-out panel, set the Weight to 10 px, and check that Dashed Line box. Enter 4 px in the first dash and gap boxes, and don’t forget to check that Aligns dashes to corners and path ends… button.

dashed line

Step 5

Make sure that your square is still selected and keep focusing on the Appearance panel. Add a second stroke and select it. Set the color to R=28 G=35 B=61 and go to Effect > Path > Offset Path. Enter a -5 px Offset, click that OK button, and then go to Effect > Stylize > Rounded Corners. Enter a 90 px Radius, click that OK button, and return to the Appearance panel. Open the Stroke fly-out menu for this new stroke, set the Weight to 5 px, and don’t forget to check the Align Stroke to Inside button.

add new stroke

Step 6

Make sure that your square is still selected and keep focusing on the Appearance panel. Select the top stroke and duplicate it using the Duplicate Selected Item button. Focus on the new stroke and simply click the existing Offset Path effect to open it. Replace the -5 px Offset with a 5 px Offset and then click that OK button. Also, open the existing Rounded Corners effect and increase the Radius to 100 px.

add new stroke

5. How to Create the Compass Needles

Step 1

Using the Rectangle Tool (M), create a 70 x 55 px shape and place it exactly as shown in the first image. Fill this new shape with R=226 G=228 B=243 and add a 4 px stroke. Align it to inside and set the color to R=28 G=35 B=61.

Make sure that your rectangle is still selected and go to Object > Path > Add Anchor Points. Pick the Delete Anchor Point Tool (-) and simply click the four anchor points highlighted in the first image to remove them. Switch to the Direct Selection Tool (A), select the top-middle anchor point, and drag it 195 px up. In the end, your shape should look like in the second image.

add anchor points

Step 2

Using the Line Tool (\), create a 225 px vertical path and place it as shown in the following image. Add a 4 px stroke for this path and set its color to R=28 G=35 B=61.

line tool

Step 3

Using the Rectangle Tool (M), create a 30 x 5 px shape, fill it with a random yellow, and place it as shown in the first image. Keep focusing on this new rectangle and switch to the Direct Selection Tool (A). Select the right anchor points and drag them 45 px up.

Reselect the Rectangle Tool (M), create a 5 px square, fill it with a random yellow, and place it as shown in the third image. Switch to the Direct Selection Tool (A), select the right anchor points, and drag them 10 px up. In the end things should look like in the fifth image.

yellow rectangle

Step 4

Focus on your Toolbar and simply double click the Blend Tool to open the Blend Options window. Select Specified Steps from the Spacing drop-down menu and enter 18 in that box. Reselect your yellow shapes, replace that fill color with R=28 G=35 B=61 and then hit Alt-Control-B to create a new blend. In the end, things should look like in the second image.

blend tool

Step 5

Select your blend along with the other two shapes that make up your compass needle and Group them (Control-G). Make sure that your group is selected and go to Effect > Distort & Transform > Transform. Set the Angle to 90 degrees and enter 3 in that Copies box. Don’t forget to check that middle-bottom reference point, and then click that OK button.

group

Step 6

Using the Pen Tool (P) , create a simple path as shown in the first image and fill it with R=246 G=248 B=255. Add a copy of this shape in the same place (Control-C > Control-F) and select it. Replace the existing fill color with R=28 G=35 B=61 and then pick the Delete Anchor Point Tool (-) and remove the anchor point highlighted in the second image.

Reselect the first shape made in this step and add a 4 px stroke. Align it to outside and set the color to R=28 G=35 B=61. Select both shapes made in this step and Group them (Control-G).

delete anchor point

Step 7

Make sure that the group made in the previous step is still selected and pick the Rotate Tool (R). Hold the Alt key from your keyboard, click exactly on the bottom anchor point to set the center point in that spot, and the Rotate window will open. Set the Angle to -90 degrees and then click that OK button. Be sure that your newly made group remains selected and simply hit Control-D twice. In the end, things should look like in the third image.

center point

Step 8

Using the Ellipse Tool (L), create a 170 px circle and place it as shown in the first image. Fill this new shape with R=28 G=35 B=61, lower its Opacity to 60% and then go to Effect > Blur > Gaussian Blur. Enter a 15 px Radius and then click that OK button. Make sure that this blurred shape stays selected and send it behind the needles using the Control-[ keyboard shortcut.

gaussian blur

6. How to Create the Compass Center

Step 1

Pick the Ellipse Tool (L) and create a 90 px circle. Fill it with R=226 G=228 B=243 and center it. Add a 4 px stroke and set its color to R=28 G=35 B=61. Duplicate the stroke, select the copy, and go to Effect > Path > Offset Path. Enter a -20 px Offset and then click that OK button.

circle

Step 2

Using the Ellipse Tool (L), create a 40 px circle and center it. Add a 2 px stroke for this new shape, set its color to R=28 G=35 B=61 and then open that Stroke fly-out panel. Focus on the Profile section and select Width Profile 1. Make three copies of this circle (Control-C > Control-F) and squeeze them gradually as shown in the following image: 30 px, 20 px and 10 px.

width profile

Step 3

Using the Pen Tool (P) or the Line Tool (\), create a 10 px vertical path and place it exactly as shown in the following image. Add a 2 px stroke for this path, set its color to R=28 G=35 B=61 and then open the Stroke fly-out panel. Check the Round Cap button and then move to the Profile section and select Width Profile 4 from that list.

Make sure that your tiny path is still selected and go to Effect > Distort & Transform > Transform. Enter the attributes shown in the following image (make sure that you check the Reflect Y box) and then click that OK button.

round cap

Step 4

Make sure that your tiny path is still selected and go to again to Effect > Distort & Transform > Transform. Enter the attributes shown in the following image and then click that OK button.

transform

7. How to Add the Text

Step 1

Pick the Type Tool (T) and open the Character panel (Window > Type > Character). Select the Milkshake font and set the size to 50 px. Simply click on your artboard and type the text. Add the four letters shown in the following image and set their color to R=28 G=35 B=61.

type tool

Step 2

Make sure that the Type Tool (T) is still active, return to the Character panel, and set the size to 30 px. Add the other four pieces of text shown in the following image and use the same color.

character panel

8. How to Add a Grungy Texture

Step 1

Using the Rectangle Tool (M), create an 810 px square and center it. Fill this new shape with R=229 G=207 B=170 and focus on the Appearance panel.

Select the fill, lower its Opacity to 50%, change the Blending Mode to Soft Light, and then go to Effect > Stylize > Rounded Corners. Enter a 110 px Radius, click that OK button, and then go to Effect > Sketch > Note Paper. Enter the attributes shown in the following image and then click that OK button.

note paper

Step 2

Make sure that your 810 px square is still selected and keep focusing on the Appearance panel. Add a second fill and select it.

Set the color to R=67 G=43 B=15, lower its Opacity to 50%, change the Blending Mode to Color Burn, and then go to Effect > Stylize > Rounded Corners. Enter a 105 px Radius, click that OK button, and then go to Effect > Path > Offset Path. Enter a -6 px Offset, click that OK button, and then go to Effect > Sketch > Note Paper. Enter the attributes shown in the following image and then click that OK button.

note paper

Step 3

Make sure that your 810 px square is still selected and keep focusing on the Appearance panel. Add a third fill and select it.

Set the color to black (R=0 G=0 B=0), lower its Opacity to 50% and change the Blending Mode to Soft Light and then go to Effect > Stylize > Rounded Corners. Enter a 110 px Radius, click that OK button, and then go to Effect > Artistic > Film Grain. Enter the attributes shown in the following image and then click that OK button.

film grain

Step 4

Make sure that your 810 px square is still selected and keep focusing on the Appearance panel. Add a fourth fill and select it.

Set the color to black, lower its Opacity to 50% and change the Blending Mode to Soft Light and then go to Effect > Stylize > Rounded Corners. Enter a 110 px Radius, click that OK button, and then go to Effect > Sketch > Graphic Pen. Enter the attributes shown in the following image and then click that OK button.

graphic pen

Step 5

Make sure that your 810 px square is still selected and keep focusing on the Appearance panel. Add one final fill and select it.

Replace the color with the linear gradient shown in the following image, change the Blending Mode to Color and then go to Effect > Stylize > Rounded Corners. Enter a 110 px Radius and then click that OK button. Keep in mind that the yellow zero from the Gradient image stands for Opacity percentage.

linear gradient

Congratulations! You’re Done!

Here is how it should look. I hope you’ve enjoyed this tutorial and can apply these techniques in your future projects. Don’t hesitate to share your final result in the comments section.

Feel free to adjust the final design and make it your own. You can find some great sources of inspiration at GraphicRiver, with interesting solutions to improve your design.

final product

How to Create a Sketch vs. Camera Effect in Adobe Photoshop

Final product image
What You’ll Be Creating

Ben Heine is a Belgian visual artist and music producer born in 1983 in Abidjan, Ivory Coast, currently living and working in Brussels, Belgium. 

He is best known for his original series “Pencil Vs Camera”, “Digital Circlism” and “Flesh and Acrylic”. He is a self-taught person in drawing, photography, and music.

Pencil Vs Camera is an original visual concept invented and popularized by Ben Heine since April 2010. The images in this series usually show a surreal hand-drawn sketch held by the artist and placed over a real photograph to symbolize the connection between reality and imagination/creativity. 

Pencil Sketch vs. Camera Photoshop Action

This effect is part of the Pencil Sketch vs. Camera Photoshop action that you can download from Envato Market.

Pencil Sketch vs Camera Photoshop Action
Pencil Sketch vs. Camera Photoshop Action

Tutorial Assets

The following assets were used during the production of this tutorial:

1. Add the Girls Photo

Create an 850 x 636 px New Document. You can, of course, use another size for your PSD file, but you have to proportionally adjust all the sizes used in this tutorial. Add the Girls stock image.

Girls stock image

2. Add the Torn Paper

Step 1

I have attached a Torn Paper PNG image that you can use. But, if you want to create your own texture of a torn paper, it’s very easy to do. You can find a piece of thick paper or cardboard and tear it roughly in the shape that you want. Then place it on a flat surface, preferably of a contrasting color (e.g. black if the paper is white). 

Take a photo using a camera or a mobile phone. Make sure that you take the picture from directly above the piece of paper so that the perspective matches what we need.

Take a Torn Paper Photo

Step 2

Upload the photo to your computer and open it in Photoshop. Using the Magic Wand Tool, make a selection and remove the background.

Remove Background in Photoshop

Step 3

Download the Torn Paper PNG image and add it in a new layer.

Add Torn Paper

Step 4

Press Control-T to rotate the Torn Paper and position it over the area that you want to turn into a sketch. 

Rotate Layer in Photoshop

Step 5

Press Control-J twice, to make two copies of the Torn Paper layer, and call them Torn Paper 1 layer and Torn Paper 2 layer.

Duplicate Layers in Photoshop

Step 6

Add a Drop Shadow layer style to the Torn Paper layer, using the color #000000.

Add Drop Shadow in Photoshop

3. Make Four Copies for the Girls Layer

Step 1

Press Control-J four times, to make four copies of the Girls layer, and call them Girls 1 layer, Girls 2 layer, Girls 3 layer, and Girls 4 layer. 

Duplicate Layers in Photoshop

Step 2

Keep the Control key pressed and select Girls 1 layer, Girls 2 layer, Girls 3 layer, and Girls 4 layer. Move them above the Torn paper layer.

Move Layers in Photoshop

4. Use the Graphic Pen and Motion Blur Filters in Photoshop

Step 1

Hide all the copy layers except the Girls 1 layer. 

Set the Foreground Color to #000000 and the Background Color to #ffffff

Step 2

For the Girls 1 layer, go to Filter > Sketch > Graphic Pen. For another image, you might have to adjust these settings.

Graphic Pen Photoshop Filter

Step 3

Go to Filter > Blur > Motion Blur.

Motion Blur Photoshop Filter

5. Use the Graphic Pen and Noise Filters in Photoshop

Step 1

Make the Girls 2 layer visible and set the blend mode to Multiply, opacity 30%. 

Step 2

Go to Filter > Sketch > Graphic Pen. For another image, you might have to adjust these settings.

Graphic Pen Photoshop Filter

Step 3

Go to Filter > Noise > Add Noise.

Add Noise Photoshop Filter

6. Use the Photocopy Filter in Photoshop

Step 1

Make the Girls 3 layer visible and set the blend mode to Multiply, opacity 100%. 

Step 2

Go to Filter > Sketch > Photocopy.

Photocopy Photoshop Filter

7. Use the Watercolor Filter in Photoshop

Step 1

Make the Girls 4 layer visible and set the blend mode to Color, opacity 100%. 

Step 2

Go to Filter > Artistic > Watercolor. You can hide the Girls 4 layer for now.

Watercolor Photoshop Filter

8. Create the Sketch Paper Piece With a Clipping Mask 

Keep the Control key pressed and select the Girls 1 layer, Girls 2 layer, Girls 3 layer, and Girls 4 layer. Right click on the selected layers and choose Create Clipping Mask.

Create Clipping Mask in Photoshop
Sketch Paper Piece in Photoshop

9. Create the Torn Paper Border

Step 1

Make the Torn Paper 1 layer visible and set the blend mode to Multiply, opacity 57%.

Create Paper Effect in Photoshop

Step 2

Make the Torn Paper 2 layer visible. Click on the Add Layer Mask button from the Layers tab to add a mask for the Torn Paper 2 layer.

Step 3

Create a new layer just below the Torn Paper 2 layer and fill it with color #ffffff

Fill Layer with Color

Step 4

Click on the Torn Paper 2 layer mask thumbnail. Go to Image > Apply Image

Apply Image in Photoshop

Step 5

Go to Image > Adjustments > Levels and enter these settings.

Levels Adjustment in Photoshop

You can use the Brush Tool and paint with color #ffffff inside the Torn Paper 2 layer if you want to add a more ripped edge effect.

Step 6

Delete the White Background layer to see the effect. 

Torn Paper Effect in Photoshop

Step 7

Keep the Control key pressed and select the Torn Paper 1 layer and the Torn Paper 2 layer. Right click on the selected layers and choose Create Clipping Mask.

Create Clipping Mask in Photoshop

10. Move the Sketch Effect Very Easily

If you want another part of your image to be turned into a sketch, simply keep the Control key pressed and select the Torn Paper 1 layer, the Torn Paper 2 layer, and the Torn Paper layer. 

Use the Move Tool to change the position of the torn paper piece.

Use the Move Tool in Photoshop

Congratulations! You’re Done!

In this tutorial, you’ve learned how to create a Sketch vs. Camera effect in Photoshop using your photos, in just a few steps.

Sketch vs Camera Photoshop Tutorial

This effect is part of the Pencil Sketch vs. Camera Photoshop action that you can download from Envato Market.

Pencil Sketch vs Camera Photoshop Action
Pencil Sketch vs. Camera Photoshop Action

Top Design to WordPress Services You Should Consider Using

Your design is signed off, and there’s just one step remaining. Afterward, you will be ready to introduce your website to the world.

You could finish the project yourself if you had the expertise to do so. Even if that was the case, it promises to be a tedious, drawn-out task you’d rather avoid.

It makes sense to hand your design over to a reliable design to WordPress service. Let the professionals do the work!

You still have to choose a service that will do your design justice. How to find a good one? Look for those, who provide the error-free, responsive, and SEO optimized HTML/CSS code. They should do so at a reasonable price and in a reasonable time frame.

These top design to WordPress services will work their magic to build a product you can take pride in:

Design to WordPress – PSDgator

The multi-talented PSDgator team does many things well, including taking your PSD, Sketch, and AI design files, and delivering fully-functional, easy to navigate WordPress themes. The green gator team even accepts PDF files, and should you present them with a file format that could best be described as somewhat obscure, they do their very best to unlock the code and proceed with development.

You can expect to receive semantic, hand-coded HTML/CSS that’s cross-browser compatible, responsive, and optimized for performance. You can also expect the work to be done quickly.

If you have an existing WordPress theme that could use an upgrade, they’ll do that as well, whether it involves some tweaking, or a complete re-slicing or redesign. PSDgator can also enhance WordPress plugins, or design new ones based on your specifications.

Whatever your needs, just send them your design files and specifications. They’ll look them over, get back to you if they have questions, comments, or suggestions, and give you a free quote.

PSD to Manythings

PSD to Manything’s team of talented and experienced professionals can provide the front-end solutions you’re looking for to meet your design to WordPress needs. They’ll collaborate with you to make sure they fully understand your requirements before proceeding, and they’ll get the job done at a reasonable price.

It’s always a good feeling to work with developers that are totally transparent about the way they go about their business, and PSD to Manythings is such a team. You’ll always be able to track your project’s status, ask questions, or make changes should the need arise.

Providing design to WordPress solutions are only a part of what this team can do. Whether you are a freelance designer, or you represent a design team or agency, feel free to consult with the PSD to Manythings team. They live up to their name.

Xfive

Xfive first made a name for itself under the XHTMLized brand a little more than 10 years ago; switching to the present brand name relatively recently. Headquartered in Australia, with main offices in Europe and the USA, this development agency has established a reputation as a business that cares for its customers, and their projects.

Xfive will be only too happy to show you how they go about their business of converting your design files to error-free, responsive, and SEO-friendly HTML/CSS code. They’ll show you step-by-step, including insights into the coding standards they work, too.

Whether you have a single project or multiple projects, or whether you are an individual designer, a design team, or represent multiple teams, Xfive has the solutions you’re looking for. They can give you a fixed-price quote, a quote for hours required, or one for a term rental.

Goodie

Goodie is not your typical development agency. Having your new website launched the Goodie way involves choosing the member of their development team you want to work with. They specialize in launching websites, including one-page websites, for small businesses. Since they’ve been at it for more than 10 years, you can rest assured your design to WordPress project will be in good hands.

The Advantages of Using Design to WordPress Services

  • Your new website will have a modern, distinctive look.

Professional development agencies, like those described here, prefer hand-coding to automated coding. Thus, you won’t have to accept look-alike websites that machine-coding tends to produce. Your new website’s layouts will definitely have a one-of-a-kind look to them.

  • Your new website will have faster load time.

When professionals do their job, it results in a website that exhibits faster load times. The reason for this is that these developers do not insert unnecessary or redundant code.

  • You can expect superior workmanship

Professional developers take pride in pleasing their clients by doing things right.

  • The code you receive will be easy to read and maintain.

Hand-coding, using semantic HTML code, is easy to read. Consequently, errors are easier to detect and resolve, as they tend to stand out. When you have a need to make changes to your website, it will be easier, and less expensive, to do them.

  • You’ll be pleased with the UX your new website offers.

There is one key reason to choose a professional Design to WordPress developer. They take pride in creating websites that provide visitors with a pleasurable experience.

A website that provides an impressive UX is a website that will experience more traffic. Consequently, conversion rates will rise.

Conclusion

Investing in a tool that will perform development tasks for you may seem to be a less expensive approach. However, the results you get cannot be compared to what a professional developer can deliver.

Is your goal to launch a website that stands out among the rest? If the answer is yes, then allowing a design to WordPress development service to do it for you is by far the best option.

How to Create a Set of Superhero Emoji in Adobe Illustrator

Final product image
What You’ll Be Creating

Today we’re going to put our superhero capes on and hop into our secret
cave, where we’re going to observe and analyze each and every detail in order
to bring five of the most iconic crime fighters to life in a vector format. We’re
going to do all of this by relying on some basic geometric shapes combined with
the power of some simple-to-use tools in Adobe Illustrator.

Before we start, don’t forget that you can expand your project by heading over to GraphicRiver where you’ll find a great selection of superhero-themed vectors.

That being said, grab a cup of that crime-fighting juice and let’s get
started!

1. How to Set Up a New Project File

Assuming you already have Illustrator up
and running in the background, bring it up and let’s set up a New Document (File > New or Control-N)
using the following settings:

  • Number
    of Artboards:
    1
  • Width:
    1000
    px
  • Height:
    600
    px
  • Units:
    Pixels

And from the Advanced tab:

  • Color
    Mode:
    RGB
  • Raster
    Effects:
    Screen (72ppi)
  • Preview Mode: Default
setting up a new document

2. How to Set Up a Custom Grid

Since we’re going to be creating the icons
using a pixel-perfect workflow, we’ll want to set up a nice little Grid so that we can have full control
over our shapes.

Step 1

Go to the Edit > Preferences > Guides & Grid submenu, and adjust
the following settings:

  • Gridline
    every:
    1 px
  • Subdivisions: 1
setting up a custom grid

Quick tip: you can learn more
about grids by reading this in-depth piece on How Illustrator’s Grid System Works.

Step 2

Once we’ve set up our custom grid, all we
need to do in order to make sure our shapes look crisp is enable the Snap to Grid and Snap to Pixel option found under the View menu, which will transform into Snap to Pixel each time you enter the Pixel Preview mode (if you’re using an older version of the
software).









Now, if you’re new to
the whole “pixel-perfect workflow”, I strongly recommend you go through my How
to Create Pixel-Perfect Artwork
tutorial, which will help you widen your
technical skills in no time.

3. How to Set Up the Layers

Once we’ve set up our document, it would
be a good idea to structure our project using a few layers, since this
way we can maintain a steady workflow by focusing on one icon at a time.

That being said, bring up the Layers panel, and create a total of six
layers, which we will rename as follows:

  • layer
    1:
    reference grids
  • layer
    2:
    batman
  • layer
    3:
    jubilee
  • layer
    4:
    baby groot
  • layer
    5:
    wonder woman
  • layer 6: luke cage
setting up the layers

4. How to Create the Reference Grids

The
reference grids (or base grids)
are a set of precisely delimited reference surfaces, which allow us to build
our icons by focusing on size and consistency.

Usually, the size of the grids determines
the size of the actual icons, and they should always be the first decision you
make once you start a new project, since you’ll always want to start from the
smallest possible size and build on that.

Now, in our case, we’re going to be creating
the icon pack using just one size, more exactly 128 x 128 px, which is a fairly large one.

Step 1

















Start by locking all
but the “reference grids” layer, and then grab the Rectangle Tool (M) and create a 128 x 128 px orange (#F15A24) square, which will help define the
overall size of our icons.

creating the reference grids main shape

Step 2





Add a smaller 120 x 120 px one (#FFFFFF) which we
will position on top of the previous shape, since it will act as our active
drawing area, thus giving us an all-around 4
px
padding to work with.

creating the active drawing areas main shape

Step 3





Select and group the
two squares together using the Control-G
keyboard shortcut, center aligning them to the underlying Artboard
afterwards. Create the remaining grids using four copies (Control-C > Control-F) at a horizontal distance of 40 px from each other, locking
the current layer before moving on to the next section.

adding the remaining reference grids

5. How to Create the Batman Emoji

Assuming you’ve successfully managed to
create the little reference grids, move on to the next layer (that would be the
second one), and let’s kick off the project by creating the dark knight.

Step 1













Start by creating the
character’s head using a 120 x 120 px circle,
which we will color using #FFDA66, and then center align to the first active
drawing area.

creating the head for the batman emoji

Step 2





Create a copy (Control-C > Control-F) of the
circle, which we will adjust by first changing its color to #2B3249, and then
cutting out a smaller 104 x 104 px one
(highlighted with red) from its center using Pathfinder’s Minus Front
Shape Mode
.

creating the circular cutout for the mask of the batman emoji

Step 3





Start working on the
mask’s upper section by creating a 120 x
64 px
rectangle (#2B3249), which we will center align to the active drawing
area’s top edge as seen in the reference image.

creating the upper section for the mask of the batman emoji

Step 4





Adjust the shape that
we’ve just created by first turning on Pixel
Preview
mode (Alt-Control-Y) and
then adding two new anchor points at a distance of 14 px from the center of the rectangle’s bottom edge using the Add Anchor Point Tool (+).

adding the first set of anchor points to the upper section of the batman emoji mask

Step 5





Select the two anchor
points that we’ve just created using the Direct
Selection Tool (A)
, and then push them to the bottom by a distance of 12 px using the Move Tool (right click >
Transform > Move > Vertical > 12 px
).

pushing the outer anchors of the mask of the batman emoji to the bottom

Step 6





Add a second pair of
anchor points at a distance of just 2 px
from the resulting shape’s bottom edge, selecting and pushing them to the
bottom by a distance of 8 px (right click > Transform > Move >
Vertical > 8 px
). Once you’re done, turn off Pixel Preview mode (Alt-Control-Y)
and then move on to the next step.

adding the second pair of anchor points to the mask of the batman emoji

Step 7





Create the subtle
shadow cast by the mask, using two copies (Control-C > Control-F twice) of the shape that we’ve just
finished adjusting, making sure to push the one from underneath to the bottom
by a distance of 8 px (right click > Transform > Move >
Vertical > 8 px
). Use Pathfinder’s
Minus Front Shape Mode to cut out the
upper copy from the bottom one, as seen in the reference image.

creating the shadow for the mask of the batman emoji

Step 8





Color the resulting
shape using #E89A54, and then make sure you position it behind the mask’s
circular cutout by right clicking >
Arrange > Send to Back
. Once you’re done, select and group all three
shapes together using the Control-G
keyboard shortcut.

positioning the shadow underneath the mask of the batman emoji

Step 9





Mask the shapes that
we’ve just grouped using a copy (Control-C)
of the underlying yellow circle, which we will paste in front (Control-F) and then use as a Clipping Mask (right click > Make Clipping Mask).

masking the main shapes for the mask of the batman emoji

Step 10





Start working on Batman’s
left pointed ear, by creating a 40 x 120
px
ellipse (#2B3249), which we will adjust by selecting its bottom anchor
points using the Direct Selection Tool
(A)
and then removing it by pressing Delete.
Then, remove the shape’s right half, positioning the resulting ear onto the
active drawing area’s top-left corner, as seen in the reference image.

creating the left ear for the batman emoji

Step 11





Create the right ear
using a copy (Control-C > Control-F)
of the one we’ve just finished working on, which we will horizontally reflect (right click > Transform > Reflect
> Horizontal
) and then position onto the opposite side of the active
drawing area.

creating the right ear for the batman emoji

Step 12





Take a couple of moments
and draw the eyes with the help of the Pen
Tool (P)
, using white (#FFFFFF) as your main Fill color. Position the resulting shapes as seen in the reference
image, selecting and grouping (Control-G)
them together before moving on to the next step.

drawing the eyes for the batman emoji

Step 13





Create the mouth
using a 12 x 8 px rounded rectangle
(#2B3249) with a 4 px Corner Radius,
which we will position at a distance of 40
px
from the active drawing area’s right edge and 26 px from its bottom one.

adding the mouth to the batman emoji

Step 14





Finish off the emoji
by adding the rough beard using a couple of 2 x 2 px circles (#2B3249) spaced both horizontally and
vertically 2 px from one another.
Take your time, and once you’re done, select and group (Control-G) each side of the beard, doing the same for the entire
icon afterwards.

finishing off the batman emoji

6. How to Create the Jubilee Emoji

Assuming you’ve
finished working on the first superhero, lock its layer and then move on up to
the next one (that would be the third one), where we’ll start working on the pyrotechnic energy-blasting superhero.

Step 1













Create the character’s
head using a 120 x 120 px circle,
which we will color using #FFDA66 and then center align to our second active
drawing area.

creating the head for the jubilee emoji

Step 2





Create the upper section
of the hair using a 120 x 48 px rectangle
(#2B3249), which we will center align to the active drawing area’s top edge.

creating the main shape for the hair of the jubilee emoji

Step 3





Adjust the shape that
we’ve just created by adding three new anchor points 2 px from one another, which we
will position 24 px from
the larger shape’s right edge.

adding a set of anchor points to the hair of the jubilee emoji

Step 4





Select the center
anchor point that we’ve just added, and the push it to the top by 8 px using the Move tool (right click >
Transform > Move > Vertical > -8 px
).

adjusting the shape of the hair of the jubilee emoji

Step 5





Add the subtle shadow
following the same process used for the first character, coloring the
resulting shape using #E89A54.

adding the subtle shadow to the hair of the jubilee emoji

Step 6





Create the hair’s
side sections using two 8 x 72 px rectangles,
which we will color using #2B3249 and then bottom align to the active drawing
area’s side edges.

adding the side hair sections for the jubilee emoji

Step 7





Select and group (Control-G) all of the hair’s composing shapes, masking (right click > Make Clipping Mask) them afterwards using a copy (Control-C > Control-F) of the
underlying circle.

masking the hair of the jubilee emoji

Step 8





Create the back
section of Jubilee’s hair, using a 96 x
12 px
rectangle (#2B3249), which we will position 16 px from the active drawing area’s
bottom edge, making sure to send it to the back of all the other shapes (right click > Arrange > Send to Back).

adding the back hair section to the jubilee emoji

Step 9





Start working on the
hair’s front-side
section, by creating an 8 x 44 px rectangle
(#2B3249), which we will position as seen in the reference image.

creating the left front hair section of the jubilee emoji

Step 10





Add another 8 x 16 px rectangle (#2B3249), which we
will adjust by selecting and removing its top-right anchor point. Position the
resulting shape onto the right side of the previous shape, at a distance of 16 px from its bottom edge, making sure
to group (Control-G) the two together
afterwards.

adding the diagonal hair section to the jubilee emoji

Step 11





Create the right section
of the character’s front hair using a copy (Control-C
> Control-F
) of the shapes that we’ve just grouped, which we will
vertically reflect (right click >
Transform > Reflect > Vertical
) and then position onto the opposite
side of the active drawing area.

adding the right hair section to the jubilee emoji

Step 12





Start working on the
left eye by creating a 20 x 12 px rectangle
(#FFFFFF), which we will position underneath the shadow, at a distance of 22 px from the left hair section.

adding the main shape for the left eye to the jubilee emoji

Step 13





Adjust the shape that
we’ve just created by setting the Radius
of its top-left corner to 4 px, its
top-right one to 12 px and its
bottom-left one to 8 px from within
the Transform panel’s Rectangle Properties.

adjusting the shape of the left eye for the jubilee emoji

Step 14





Add an 8 x 8 px circle (#2B3249) to the center
of the resulting shape, followed by a smaller 4 x 4 px one (#FFFFFF) which we will align to its top-right corner.
Once you’re done, select and group all three shapes together using the Control-G keyboard shortcut.

adding details to the left eye of the jubilee emoji

Step 15





Create the right eye
using a copy (Control-C > Control-F)
of the one that we’ve just finished working on, which we will vertically
reflect (right click > Transform >
Reflect > Vertical
) and then position onto the opposite side of the
head. Once you’re done, select and group (Control-G)
both eyes together before moving on to the next step.

adding the right eye to the jubilee emoji

Step 16





Start working on the
mouth by creating the character’s lips using a 20 x 12 px ellipse (#F97F55) which we will adjust by pinching its
side anchor points using the Anchor
Point Tool (Shift-C)
. Once you’re done, center align the resulting shape to
the larger underlying circle, positioning it at a distance of 12 px from the eyes.

adding the lips to the jubilee emoji

Step 17





Add the mouth using an 8 x 4 px ellipse (#2B3249), which we
will center align to the shape from the previous step.

adding the mouth to the jubilee emoji

Step 18





Add the visible section
of the teeth, using an 8 x 2 px rectangle
(#FFFFFF), which we will center align to the mouth’s top edge, masking (right click > Make Clipping Mask) it
afterwards using a copy (Control-C >
Control-F
) of the underlying shape. Once you’re done, select and group (Control-G) all of the mouth’s composing
sections, before moving on to the next step.

adding the teeth to the jubilee emoji

Step 19





Create the blush spots
using two 16 x 12 px ellipses
(#FFB266), which we will position at a distance of 4 px from the character’s eyes and 12 px from its hair’s side sections. Once you’re done, select and
group (Control-G) all of the shapes
that we’ve created so far, before moving on to the next step.

adding the blush spots to the jubilee emoji

Step 20





Start working on the
glasses by creating the upper section of the frame using a 104 x 8 px rectangle (#BDC9E5), which we will adjust by setting the
Radius of its top corners to 4 px. Center align the resulting shape
to the underlying active drawing area, positioning it at a distance of 4 px from its top edge.

creating the upper section of the glasses for the jubilee emoji

Step 21





Create the lens section
using a 104 x 28 px rectangle
(#F97F55), which we will adjust by setting the Radius of its bottom corners to 8 px, positioning the resulting shape below the frame.

creating the lower section of the glasses for the jubilee emoji

Step 22





Adjust the shape by
adding a pair of new anchor points at a distance of 4 px from its center, followed by another one at a distance of 12 px. Once you have the anchors in
place, select the middle pair and push it to the top by 12 px (right click > Transform > Move > Vertical > -12 px).

adjusting the shape of the glasses for the jubilee emoji

Step 23





Start working on the
highlight by creating the first pair using a 4 x 20 px rectangle (#FFFFFF) followed by a narrower 2 x 20 px one (#FFFFFF) positioned just 2 px from the wider one. Adjust
the shapes by selecting and pushing their bottom anchor points to the left by 8 px (right click Transform > Move > Horizontal > -8 px), grouping (Control-G) and positioning the
resulting shapes as seen in the reference image.

adding the first set of highlights to the glasses of the jubilee emoji

Step 24





Finish off the glasses, and with them the emoji itself, by adding the second pair of highlights using a
copy (Control-C > Control-F) of
the ones that we’ve just finished working on, which we will position onto the opposite
side. Once you’re done, select and group (Control-G)
all of the glasses’ composing shapes, doing the same for all of the character’s
composing sections before moving on to the next one.

finishing off the jubilee emoji

7. How to Create the Baby Groot Emoji

Assuming you’ve
finished working on the second emoji, lock its layer and then move on up to the
next one (that would be the fourth one), where we’ll create cute little Baby Groot.

Step 1













Start working on the
character’s head by creating its lower section using a 120 x 92 px rectangle (#B5725B), which we will adjust by setting
the Radius of its bottom corners to 60 px. Once you’re done, center align
the resulting shape to the active drawing area’s bottom edge.

creating the lower head section for the baby groot emoji

Step 2





Create the head’s
upper section using a couple of varying width and height rectangles (#B5725B),
which we will adjust by setting the Radius
of some of their upper corners to 4 px.
Once you’re done, select and group (Control-G)
all of the head’s composing shapes, before moving on to the next step.

creating the upper head section for the baby groot emoji

Step 3





Take a couple of
moments and add the grass sections, using #B6D65F as your main Fill color, moving on to the next step once
you’re done.

adding the grass sections to the baby groot emoji

Step 4





Give the character some
texture, by adding a couple of rounded rectangles (#82453B) with a 1 px Corner Radius, which we will
position as seen in the reference image. Once you’re done, make sure you select
and group (Control-G) all of them
together, doing the same for all the head’s composing sections as well.

adding the texture lines to the baby groot emoji

Step 5





Start working on Groot’s
eyes, by creating the main shape for its left one using a 16 x 16 px circle (#2B3249), which we will position at a distance
of 32 px from the active drawing
area’s left edge and 40 px from its
bottom one.

creating the left eye for the baby groot emoji

Step 6





Create a slightly wider
24 x 12 px ellipse (#B5725B), which
we will position onto the lower section of the previously created, making sure
to mask it afterwards using a copy (Control-C
> Control-F
) of the smaller circle (right
click > Make Clipping Mask
).

adding the left lower eye section to the baby groot emoji

Step 7





Add the little highlight
using a 4 x 4 px circle (#FFFFFF),
which we will position at a distance of 4
px
from the eye’s top and right edges. Once you’re done, select and group (Control-G) all three shapes together
before moving on to the next step.

adding the left eye highlight to the baby groot emoji

Step 8





Create the right eye
using a copy (Control-C > Control-F)
of the one that we’ve just finished working on, which we will position onto the
opposite side of the head, making sure to select and group (Control-G) the two together once you’re
done.

adding the right eye to the baby groot emoji

Step 9





Add the character’s
mouth using an 8 x 8 px circle,
which we will color using #2B3249 and then position at a distance of 40 px from the active drawing area’s
right edge and 28 px from its bottom
one.

creating the mouth for the baby groot emoji

Step 10





Move a few pixels down
and add the blush spots using two 16 x
12 px
ellipses (#A0604E), which we will position at a distance of 32 px from the active drawing area’s
bottom edge and 16 px from its side
ones.

adding the blush spots to the baby groot emoji

Step 11





Create the left eyebrow,
using two 4 x 4 px circles (#82453B),
horizontally spaced 12 px from
one another. Push the right circle to the top by a distance of just 2 px (right click > Transform > Move > Vertical > -2 px), and
then connect the two using a diagonal rectangle, making sure to group (Control-G) and position the shapes as
seen in the reference image.

adding the left eyebrow to the baby groot emoji

Step 12





Finish off Groot, by
adding the right eyebrow using a copy of the one that we’ve just created,
which we will vertically reflect (right
click > Transform > Reflect > Vertical
) and then position onto
the opposite side of the head. Once you’re done, group (Control-G) the two together, doing the same for all of the emoji’s
composing sections, before moving on to the next one.

finishing off the baby groot emoji

8. How to Create the Wonder Woman Emoji

Make sure you’ve
locked the previous layer, and then move on up to the next one (that would be
the fifth one) where we will start working on the Amazonian goddess.

Step 1













As we did with all the
other ones, start by creating the character’s head using a 120 x 120 px circle, which we will color using #FFDA66 and then center
align to our second active drawing area.

creating the head for the wonder woman emoji

Step 2





Start working on the
hair by creating a 120 x 120 px square
(#2B3249), from the bottom of which we will cut out a smaller 88 x 72 px rectangle (highlighted with
red) using Pathfinder’s Minus Front Shape Mode.

creating the hair section for the wonder woman emoji

Step 3





Mask the resulting shape
using a copy (Control-C) of the
underlying circle, which we will paste in front (Control-F) and then use as a Clipping
Mask
(right click > Make Clipping
Mask
).

masking the hair for the wonder woman emoji

Step 4





Start working on the
hair’s side sections by creating the main shape for its left one using a 16 x 40 px rectangle (#2B3249), which
we will align to the active drawing area’s left edge, positioning it at a
distance of 20 px from its bottom
edge.

creating the left hair section for the wonder woman emoji

Step 5





Next, we’re going to
go a little off the grid, by creating the curled section using a 32 x 32 px circle (#2B3249), which we
will adjust by cutting out another 32 x
32 px
one (highlighted with red) from its top-left section. Once you’re
done, position the resulting shape as seen in the reference image, selecting
and grouping (Control-G) it and the
previously created rectangle together.

adding the left curl to the hair of the wonder woman emoji

Step 6





Create the right hair
section using a copy (Control-C >
Control-F
) of the one that we’ve just finished working on, which we will
vertically reflect (right click >
Transform > Reflect > Vertical
) and then position onto the opposite
side of the head.

adding the right hair curl to the wonder woman emoji

Step 7





Next, grab the Pen Tool (P) and draw the iconic crown,
using #FFB266 as your main Fill
color. Use the reference image as your main guide, moving on to the next step
once you’re done.

drawing the crown for the wonder woman emoji

Step 8





Give the resulting shape
a pair of vertical highlights using a 4
x 36 px
rectangle (#FFFFFF) positioned 2 px away horizontally from a narrower 2
x 36 px
one (#FFFFFF), which we will group (Control-G) and then position at a distance of 20 px from the crown’s right edge. Once you’re done, mask the
highlights and then move on to the next step.

adding the highlights to the crown of the wonder woman emoji

Step 9





Quickly draw the star
using #F97F55 as your main Fill color,
selecting and grouping all of the crown’s composing shapes afterwards using the
Control-G keyboard shortcut.

adding the star to the crown of the wonder woman emoji

Step 10





As we did with all the
other characters, add the subtle shadow (#E89A54), making sure to position it
behind the hair’s side sections (right click
> Arrange > Send Backward
). Once you’re done, select and group all of
the current shapes together using the Control-G
keyboard shortcut.

adding the subtle shadow to the crown of the wonder woman emoji

Step 11





Start working on the
eyes, by creating the main shape for the left one using a 20 x 12 px ellipse (#FFFFFF), which we will adjust by pinching its
side anchor points using the Anchor
Point Tool (Shift-C)
. Position the resulting shape underneath the crown’s shadow,
at a distance of 14 px from the left
hair section.

creating the left eye for the wonder woman emoji

Step 12





Continue adjusting
the eye, by selecting its top anchor point using the Direct Selection Tool (A), and then pushing it to the left by 2 px (right click > Transform > Move >
Horizontal > -2 px
).

adjusting the shape of the left eye for the wonder woman emoji

Step 13





Add the eye’s
remaining details using an 8 x 8 px circle
(#2B3249) which we will position in the center of the resulting shape, followed
by a smaller 4 x 4 px one (#FFFFFF)
in its top-right corner. Once you’re done, select and group (Control-G) all three shapes together,
before moving on to the next step.

adding details to the left eye of the wonder woman emoji

Step 14





Create the right eye
using a copy (Control-C > Control-F)
of the one that we’ve just finished working on, which we will vertically
reflect (right click > Transform >
Reflect > Vertical
) and then position onto the opposite side of the
head. Once you have the copy in place, select both it and the original and
group them together using the Control-G
keyboard shortcut.

adding the right eye to the wonder woman emoji

Step 15





Start working on the
mouth by creating a 20 x 16 px ellipse
(#2B3249), which we will center align to the larger underlying circle,
positioning it at a distance of 8 px from
the character’s eyes.

creating the mouth for the wonder woman emoji

Step 16





Add the teeth using a
20 x 6 px rectangle (#FFFFFF), and
the tongue using a 20 x 12 px ellipse
(#F97F55), which we will position as seen in the reference image, making sure
to group (Control-G) and mask them
afterwards. Once you’re done, select and group (Control-G) all of the mouth’s composing shapes before moving on to
the next step.

adding the teeth and tongue to the wonder woman emoji

Step 17





Finish off the emoji,
by adding the blush spots using two 16 x
12 px
ellipses (#FFB266), which we will position as seen in the reference
image. Take your time, and once you’re done, select and group (Control-G) the two together, doing the
same for the entire character afterwards.

finishing off the wonder woman emoji

9. How to Create
the Luke Cage Emoji

We are now down
to our fifth and last superhero, which is one of my all-time favorite Marvel characters.
That being said, take a quick sip of that second coffee, and let’s
jump into it!

Step 1













Start by creating the
character’s head using a 120 x 120 px circle,
which we will color using #B5725B and then center align to the last active
drawing area.

creating the head for the luke cage emoji

Step 2





Add the hair section
using a 96 x 24 px rectangle (#2B3249),
which we will center align to the circle’s top edge and then adjust by setting
the Radius of its top corners to 8 px.

adding the hair to the luke cage emoji

Step 3





Grab the Pen Tool (P) and draw Luke’s headband
using #BDC9E5 as your Fill color. 

drawing the headband for the luke cage emoji

Step 4





As we did with Wonder
Woman, give the band a set of vertical highlights (#FFFFFF) followed by the
subtle shadow (#8E5042), making sure to group (Control-G) and mask the shapes afterwards. Once you’re done, select
and group (Control-G) all of the
other composing sections as well.

adding the highlights and shadow to the luke cage emoji

Step 5





Start working on the
eyes by creating the main shape for the left one using a 16 x 16 px circle (#FFFFFF), which we will position at a distance
of 32 px from the active drawing
area’s left edge and 4 px from the
band’s shadow.

adding the main shape for the left eye to the luke cage emoji

Step 6





Create the pupil using
an 8 x 8 px circle (#2B3249), onto
the top-right corner of which we will add a 4 x 4 px circular highlight (#FFFFFF).

adding details to the left eye of the luke cage emoji

Step 7





Create the eyelid
using a 24 x 12 px ellipse (#B5725B),
which we will position on the upper section of the eye so that its bottom
half overlaps it. Mask the shape (right
click > Make Clipping Mask
) using a copy (Control-C > Control-F) of the underlying circle, selecting and
grouping all of the eye’s composing shapes together before moving on to the
next step.

adding the left eyelid to the luke cage emoji

Step 8





Create the right eye using
a copy (Control-C > Control-F) of
the one that we’ve just finished working on, which we will position on the
opposite side of the head. Once you have the copy in place, select both it and
the original and group them together using the Control-G keyboard shortcut.

adding the right eye to the luke cage emoji

Step 9





Create the beard using a
36 x 40 px rectangle (#2B3249),
which we will adjust by setting the Radius
of its top corners to 12 px and
its bottom ones to 18 px. Once you’re done, center
align the resulting shape to the underlying head, positioning it at a distance
of 6 px from its bottom edge.

adding the beard to the luke cage emoji

Step 10





Add the mouth cutout
using a 28 x 16 px rounded rectangle
(#B5725B) with an 8 px Corner Radius,
which we will center align to the beard, positioning it at a distance of 8 px from its top edge.

adding the beard cutout to the luke cage emoji

Step 11





Create the actual mouth
using a 12 x 8 px rounded rectangle
(#2B3249) with a 4 px Corner Radius,
which we will center align to the cutout, positioning it at a distance of 4 px from its right edge.

adding the mouth to the luke cage emoji

Step 12





Give the beard a small
inner facing segment using a 12 x 2 px rectangle
(#2B3249) which we will adjust by individually selecting and pushing its top
anchor points to the inside by a distance of 2 px (right click > Transform > Move > Horizontal > +
/ – 2 px
depending on which side you start with). Position the resulting shape to
the center of the cutout’s bottom edge, selecting and grouping (Control-G) all of the mouth’s composing
shapes before moving on to the next step.

adding the little beard segment to the luke cage emoji

Step 13





Finish off the
character and with it the project itself, by adding the rough beard using a
couple of 2 x 2 px circles (#2B3249)
distanced both horizontally and vertically at 2 px from one another. Take your time, and once you’re done, select
and group (Control-G) each side of
the beard, doing the same for the entire icon afterwards.

finishing off the luke cage emoji

Avengers
Assemble!





Great job! As always, I
hope you’ve managed to keep up with each and every step, and maybe learned a
trick or two along the way.

finished project preview

My Journey Of Learning Programming Through Flatiron School #41

My name is Mason Ellwood, and I’m currently working on Flatiron School’s Online Full Stack Web Development Program. Each week, I’ll be writing about my experience, what I’m learning, and tips on learning to code.

At work, like all things I have encountered large and small issues, but that is like all things. But I have been reflecting a lot with my role in the company and how to best perform in my front-end developer role at Fyresite.

So I have been at this company now for roughly 6 weeks and almost all my energy has been directed at one project, Prepass. They build electronic tolling software for truckers, and my role is to write out the functionality of the site, with one other coworker Paul. This has been a crash course for me, diving head first into WordPress, php, html, css, ajax, and javascript. But this post is not so much about the languages I have used, but more how I have began to approach the challenges of building out this site.

When I first began at Fyresite, I was given access to the sketch doc that included all the designs for the pages that I was in charge of building out. Which after a few weeks I was closer and closer to having a working model of the site. But constantly I was met with having to add functionality and everything I had built needed to be altered in some way. So the hours are stacking and stacking, having to constantly rebuilding what I had made, because it didn’t quite include all the functionality that the client was asking of me. This left me with a lot of frustration having to basically start over on some major pages on the site.

I have since completed the projects that were asked of me, but I am slowly learning to really take my time and pour myself into thinking a lot about what the client may also want with what a simple sketch mock may include. Programming for the future rather than what is immediately asked of me so the product is amenable dynamic enough so that I won’t have to build for future problems that the client may want. Build for their needs, not the immediate needs that I see to quickly complete the project. Thinking about programming in this way, will save me inmens time in the future and make the transition to handing the client a final project easier.

This has translated a lot into how I view my lessons with The Flatiron School. Being able to see how something may have to work for the future, rather than what I need it to do to complete a task.

In school, I have finally begun the javascript course and I couldn’t be having more fun. Not only is it making my life so much easier at work, but it makes learning so much greater with a goal of application.